Saturday, July 22, 2017

Top Veterinary Articles of the Week: Cherry Eye, Ticks versus Skin Tags, and more ...

Cherry Eye in Dogs – Prolapse of the Third Eyelid Gland

Dr. Christopher Byers/CriticalCareDVM

Cherry eye. Photo A Vet in Training

There are a lot of articles about cherry eye out there, and I featured some of them. What I like about Dr. Byers' articles is how well he explains each topic.

Simply put, cherry eye is a third eyelid out of place. Nobody really knows what makes that happen, but some breeds are more predisposed to this problem. An interesting point Dr. Byers brings up is that when this affects only one eye, the other is likely to follow.

Diagnosis is pretty straightforward, and the go-to treatment is surgery to put things back to where they ought to be. There are two types of surgeries. Removal is rarely recommended because it leads to dry eye and other disturbances of the eye.


Seven Things You Can Do to Enhance Your Dog’s Longevity

Dr. Nancy Kay/Spot Speaks

Before you get all excited, I have to warn you that you might be disappointed. Not because these things don't work but because it's something everybody should be doing all along; something people would rather replace with some sort of a miracle snap of the fingers.

While miracles might make it on a prescription pad at some point in the future, for now, it's day-to-day work and care that is the gold standard. These things are not a secret, but they are not something you can do without putting some effort into it.

Here are the things that will enhance your dog's longevity and quality of life:

  1. optimal body condition score/weight
  2. quality diet
  3. exercise
  4. staying on top of pain and existing conditions
  5. prevention
  6. due diligence
  7. regular wellness exams
Surprised? I didn't think so. And yet, these things go a long way for long and happy life for your dog. Read Dr. Kay's breakdown of each of the points and why they are important.


The Breathtaking Adventures of Ticks -
Plain and Simple (Part 1)

Else-Vet

I only recently discovered this channel and I really admire the fun way they introduce and explain various subjects. Enjoy.




Is it a Tick? How to Tell if it’s a Tick on Your Dog or Cat, and how to Remove it!

Dr. Karen Louis/Vetchick.com

You might think this is funny, but I can tell you there are plenty of people posting photos of various bumps on their dogs asking the very same question. "Is this a tick?"

I can also tell you that if we feel something suspicious, I do have to grab my glasses, a flashlight and get down on the ground to get a good look.

I imagine this is particularly difficult to determine for people who never found a tick on their dog before, God bless them and the region they live in.

Dr. Karen breaks it down quite beautifully.

  1. Ticks have legs
  2. Live ticks move
  3. Ticks are floppy

It still does involve glasses (when applicable) and good light to see all that. You don't want to pluck out a skin tag or a nipple, and you do want to know how to remove a tick properly.


Facts About Skin Tags on Dogs and Their Removal

Adrienne Janet Farricelli/PetHelpful

Tick or tag? Photo PetHelpful

Since we are on the topic of skin tags versus ticks, you don't want to miss out on this article. It breaks down ticks, versus skin tags, versus warts.

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Dog Medical Emergencies Survey: Is Ingestion of Grapes an Emergency?

72.97% survey participants check ingestion of grapes as being an emergency.


Grape toxicity for dogs is poorly understood in a way that nobody knows why they are toxic to them.

There are stories out there of people who insist that they give their dog the odd grape and their dogs are fine. Some dogs seem to handle that with no problems indeed.

There are people who jumped or fell from great heights and lived too. 


One man apparently even survived a 47-floor fall. The question is whether you should go and try to see if you would too.

I know I am not going to.


There are dogs that went into kidney failure after eating a single grape. Are you willing to take that chance?

I recommend always treating grape/raising ingestion as an emergency.


"If you suspect that your pet has eaten any of these fruits, please contact your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline, an animal poison control service, immediately. Do not waste any time. Since there are still many unknowns associated with this poisoning, it is better not to take any chances when it comes to your dog's health." ~VCA Hospitals

This toxicity includes all types of grapes. raisin bread, trail mix, cereals with raisins ... in other words, anything to do with grapes, raisins or currants.

One upside is that grapes and raisins seem to digest slowly and evacuating the stomach can be effective up to several hours after ingestion. However, I advise against trying to deal with this on your own. There are many scenarios when inducing vomiting is a bad plan and there is way more to it.


If your dog ingests grapes or raisins, do not take the chance.


Keep grapes, raisins, and currants away from your dog and if they do manage to eat some, do treat it as an emergency.



Btw, if you like conspiracy theories, check out the following video. Do you think they are onto something? Might be a valid theory.



Further reading:
Grape and raisin toxicity
Grape and Raisin Poisoning in Dogs

Related articles:
Dog Medical Emergencies Survey
Dog Medical Emergencies Survey Results
Is Unproductive Retching an Emergency?
Is Difficulty Breathing an Emergency?
Is Panting an Emergency?
Is Severe Pain an Emergency?
Is Limping an Emergency?
Is Vomiting Bile in the Morning an Emergency?
Is Profuse Vomiting an Emergency?
Are Convulsions or Seizures an Emergency?
Is Loss of Appetite an Emergency?
Is Reduced Activity an Emergency?
Is Severe Lethargy an Emergency?
Is Inability to Stand an Emergency?
Is Inability to Urinate an Emergency?
Are Cuts and Abrasions an Emergency?
Is Bleeding an Emergency?
Is Blood in Vomit an Emergency?
Is Fresh Blood in Stool an Emergency?
Is Black, Tarry Stool an Emergency?
Are Pale Gums an Emergency?
Is an Unresponsive Dog an Emergency?
Is Coughing an Emergency?
Is Choking an Emergency?
Is Head Pressing and Emergency?
Are Bug Stings an Emergency?
Are Spider or Snake Bites an Emergency?
Are Animal Bites an Emergency?
Is Ingestion of Poison an Emergency?
Is Xylitol Ingestion an Emergency?



Symptoms to Watch for in Your Dog now available in paperback and Kindle. Each chapter includes notes on when it is an emergency.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

One Yelp, No Yelp - Update

Continued from part I

I hate it when it looks like there might be something wrong with my dog, particularly when it is unclear what it could be.


Two random yelps might not warrant a vet visit but do warrant attention.


With hubby gone for the week, Cookie and I were all by ourselves, without a vehicle. Seeing a vet would mean getting one of our neighbors taking us. And even as paranoid as I am, without any other discernible sign of a problem, doing all that seemed overboard.

I reached to our animal communicator to see if she could shed some light on it.


She did provide some pointers as well as other things I should take a closer look at.

I did send the report to Cookie's physical therapist and after hubby returned we followed up with both chiropractor and PT visit.

The chiropractor did find some spots that needed adjusting in the pelvic region, though they didn't seem as painful as they sometimes can get. The PT didn't find anything of note either. So what went on? Did it go away on its own? Did the chiropractic adjustment take care of it? Or was the cause of both yelps something external after all? I guess we might not never know unless it happens again, which I hope it doesn't.

The good news is that there were no more yelps.


So hopefully we are in a clear.

The communicator pointed couple more potential issues relating to Cookie's liver and water intake. Because Cookie's spring lab work was all clean and she hasn't been showing any signs of an issue, I decided to gently tend to her liver by giving her Milk Thistle for a week, followed by whole dandelion. a whole dandelion is good for both liver and kidneys. I didn't want to ignore it but didn't want to go overboard either so the gentle support seemed to make sense to me.

It does seem that Cookie sometimes shows less interest in drinking than she should so to offset that I stocked up on some frozen raw goats milk. She loves it and this way she can rehydrate, cool down and get some awesome nutrients all in one.

So that's where we're at.


So far so good but remaining diligent as always.


Related articles:
From The End Of A Lead Line To Casa Jasmine: Meet Cookie, Our New Adoptee
And So It Begins Again(?) Our First Health-Related Heart Attack With Cookie 
I Didn't Know I Could Fly: Why Cookie Wears A Harness Instead Of A Collar
C.E.T. Oral Hygiene Chews For Dogs CAN Be A Choking Hazzard 
Our First Health-Related Heart Attack With Cookie: The Knee Or The Foot?
Creative Solutions And An Incidental Product Review
Too Young For Pot: Cookie's Snack With A Side Of Hydrogen Peroxide  
Taming Of The Wild Beast: Cookie's Transition To Civilization  
Staying On Top Of The Ears: Cookie Is Not Impressed  
Putting The Easy Back Into Walking
Cookie's Ears Are Still Not Happy 
The Threat Of The Bulge Is Always Lurking 
Today Is Cookie's Three-Months Adoptoversary  
Cookie Meets The Electric Horse Fence And Her First Chiropractic Adjustment  
Why Examine Your Dog's Vomit? 
Why Is That Leg Still Not Happy? Cookie's Leg Keeps Getting Sore 
Cookie Too Is Insured With Trupanion
Does Being Insured Mean Being Covered? Our First Claim With Trupanion
Is Cookie's Leg Finally Getting Better?
Is Cookie Going To Be Another Medical Challenge Or Are We Looking Too Closely? 
The Project That Is Cookie: Pancreatitis Up Close And Personal  
Pancreatitis: Cookie’s Blood Work   
Another Belly Upset: Pancreatitis Again Or Not?  
Happy Birthday, Cookie 
Incontinence? Cookie's Mysterious Leaks 
Who's Training Whom? Stick And Treat 
Don't Just Stand There, Do Something? Cookie's Mysterious Bumps 
Cookie's Mysterious Bumps Update
One Vomit, No Vomit 
Happy One-Year Adoptoversary, Cookie!
Cookie's Leaks Are Back: Garden Variety Incontinence Or Not?
Cookie's Leaks Update 
Don't Panic, Don't Panic: Know What Your Job Is 
The Continuing Saga Of Cookie's Leeks: Trying Chiropractic Approach 
Cookie's Minor Eye Irritation
Regular Wellness Exam: Cookie's ALT Was Elevated 
Cookie's Plantar Paw Pad Injury 
How Far To Take It When The Dog Isn't Sick?
Cookie Has Tapeworm Infection 
Cookie's Elevated ALT: The Ultrasound and Cytology  
Cookie's ALT Update
The Importance of Observation: Cookie's Chiropractic Adjustment
Sometimes You Don't Even Know What You're Looking at: Cookie's Scary "We Have No Idea What that Was" 
Living with an Incontinent Dog 
Summer Dangers: Cookie Gets Stung by a Bald-faced Hornet 
To Breathe or Not To Breathe: Cookie's Hind Legs Transiently Fail to Work (Again)
Figuring out What Might Be Going on with Cookie's Legs: The Process 
Figuring out What Might Be Going on with Cookie's Legs: The Diagnosis 
Cookie's Iliopsoas Injury Treatment: Trazodone  
Cookie's Iliopsoas Injury Treatment: Other Medications 
Cookie's Iliopsoas Injury Treatment: Laser, Hydrotherapy, and Chiropractic 
Cookie's Recovery from Iliopsoas Injury: ToeGrips 
It Never Rains ... Cookie's New Injury 
Mixed Emotions: When What You Should Do Might Not Be What You Should Do for Your Dog 
Cookie's New Injury Update 
Cookie's Iliopsoas Injury: The Symptoms 
Cookie's Iliopsoas Injury: Battling the Zoomies 
Cookie's Muscle Injuries: What Else Is Going On?
Theory and Actual Decisions for an Actual Dog Aren't the Same Thing: Cookie's Knee Injury
Does Your Vet Listen to You? Cookie's Post-Sedation Complications
Would I Ever Treat a Symptom Directly? 
Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Treatment for Cookie's Bad Knee(s)
Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) for Cookie's Bad Cruciate Update 
Injury or Surgery Recovery: Mishaps versus Setbacks 
See Something, Do Something: Cookie's Lumpectomy 
Cookie's Lumpectomy Update 
Using Pressure Pads to Evaluate Lameness in Dogs: My Observations
Cookie's Musculoskeletal Challenges: What Supplements Am I Using?
Cookie's Musculoskeletal Challenges: Restricted Activity and Weight Management
Cookie's PRP Treatment for Partial Cruciate Tear: Update
Has Your Dog's Physical Therapist Taken Dog Training Classes? 
Cookie's PRP Treatment for Partial Cruciate Tear Update and Considering the Future
Cookie's PRP Treatment for Partial Cruciate (CCL/ACL) Tear and Leg Circumference
Cookie's Wellness Exam
Ticked Off at the Tick Situation: What Do You Use for Tick Prevention?
Ticked Off at the Tick Situation: The Verdict Is In (for Now)
Cookie's Annual Heartworm and Tick-Borne Diseases Test
One Yelp, No Yelp. But Two?



Do you have a story to share?

Your story can help others, maybe even save a life!


What were the first signs you noticed? How did your dog get diagnosed? What treatment did/didn't work for you? What was your experience with your vet(s)? How did you cope with the challenges?

Email me, I'll be happy to hear from you.




Symptoms to Watch for in Your Dog now available in paperback and Kindle. Each chapter includes notes on when it is an emergency.

Monday, July 17, 2017

Adoption Monday: Lee, Labrador Retriever, Page, AZ

Lee came with a horrible wound around his neck. This wound was caused by a collar that was never removed or loosened as he grew. After a round of antibiotics, a good diet, and much love, his neck has healed up and only minor scar tissue is left.


Lee has put the past behind him.


He is neutered and now is looking for an active and loving home. Lee is very smart and he wants to learn. He is also a great dog on the leash, in the car, and a great love bug.


Lee likes to play with other dogs but is not a fan of kitties.
Apply at pageanimaladoptionagency.com.

***

Page Animal Adoption Agency is a 501c3 nonprofit organization that provides animal adoption, education, and low-cost spay and neuter services to Page, Arizona, and the surrounding communities.

Page Animal Adoption Agency began about four years ago as a small group of people who wanted to reduce the number of unwanted pets being euthanized in the city shelter. Now, they are in the process of renovating a building donated by the city to turn it into an Adoption Center of which Page can be proud. Through fundraising efforts and generous donations, that goal gets closer every month.

Saturday, July 15, 2017

Top Veterinary Articles of the Week: Antibiotics for UTI? Reverse Sneezing and Parainfluenza

Abuse of Antibiotics for Urinary Tract Disease

Dr. Donna Spector/The Expert Vet

Photo Pixabay

This one is not an article but a podcast; even better. It's an episode of the Radio Pet Lady, The Expert Vet radio show. It is the best, most insightful pet podcast library I have ever listened to, rivaled only by The Pet Cancer Vet.

I have learned a lot of fantastic info on these shows; stuff one won't learn anywhere else.

This particular podcast brings up the topic of antibiotic treatment for urinary tract infections, more accurately, treatment of laboratory findings. A routine urinalysis is an important tool, and I use it regularly. It's an affordable, non-invasive way to screen for kidney issues, early detection of diabetes and other problems. But what if your veterinarian finds bacteria in the urine during the routine analysis? Should it be treated? Does the mere presence of bacteria mean there is a problem? What if there are no signs your dog is actually sick?

If it ain't broke, don't fix it. The presence of bacteria if urine does not automatically mean a disease and lack of bacteria does not mean a lack of an active infection. Jasmine had a UTI twice, and in neither case, any bacteria was found in the sample.

The old belief that a healthy urinary tract is always sterile seems obsolete. What if there are bacteria but not causing any harm?

The overuse of antibiotics is an increasing problem. The risk of breeding resistant strains is always at play. Learn whether you should let your veterinarian prescribe antibiotics solely based on finding a presence of bacteria in urine in The Expert Vet podcast.


Reverse Sneezing in Dogs & Cats – Should You Be Worried?

Dr. Christopher Byers/CriticalCareDVM

Not the first article on reverse sneezing out there but Dr. Byers always provides a thorough and comprehensive overview of every subject. In summary, reverse sneezing looks very scary but usually is nothing to worry about.

However, if it happens frequently, the episodes are severe, or there are other worrisome signs present, it is time to get to the bottom of it.


Parainfluenza in Dogs: What Is It?

Dr. Jean Dodds

Do you ever feel that they design medical terms just to confuse the heck out of people? Why else would they use the word parainfluenza for something that has nothing to do with the flu?

Let's break this down. Influenza, also known as the flu, is a viral infection of the respiratory passages. That, btw also has nothing to do with stomach "flu" either.

The prefix para- has a bunch of meanings, such as near, resembling, beyond or abnormal.

Parainfluenza, then, is also a viral disease, that resembles the flu. Why does the distinction matter? It matters when you're talking about vaccines. Flu vaccines do nothing against parainfluenza and vice versa. In dogs, the parainfluenza virus rarely causes very little trouble, unless it joins forces with Bordetella bacterium. Those two like gang up to cause kennel cough.

In her article, Dr. Dodds breaks down what parainfluenza is, how infections work and what is the vaccine efficacy.

Thursday, July 13, 2017

Dog Medical Emergencies Survey: Is Xylitol Ingestion an Emergency?

86.49% survey participants check ingestion of xylitol as being an emergency.



This says to me that some people might not know what xylitol is and why is it dangerous to dogs. At least I hope that's why they checked no.

What is Xylitol?


Xylitol is a sugar replacement, a sweetener, used more broadly every day because of low caloric density and lesser impact on tooth health. It is still a type of carbohydrate, sugar alcohol.

It is considered safe for people unless somebody finds otherwise. However, it is highly toxic to dogs. Why?

Because the body still looks at xylitol as sugar, it is treated as such when it makes its way into the blood stream. Which means that insulin is dispatched. In people, xylitol is absorbed slowly, and no harm is done. I dogs, however, it absorbs rapidly, and the response is a massive amount of insulin. This very quickly results in potentially life-threatening hypoglycemia.

What Happens in the Dog's Body with Xylitol Poisoning article explains this in detail.

What is hypoglycemia?


Glucose is a form of sugar that circulates in the bloodstream. Glucose is a source of fuel for cells in the body. Hypoglycemia is an insufficient amount of this fuel. If your car runs out of fuel, the engine dies, but you can refuel and be on your merry way. It doesn't work the same way with a living body, particularly the brain which has an extremely high energy requirement.



Just a tiny amount of xylitol can kill a dog.


Just three little pieces of sugar-free gum with xylitol are enough to kill a small dog! While xylitol is a food substance for us, it is poison to dogs. That's right, a poison. It is way more dangerous than chocolate, and it is less known.

To make things worse, xylitol is being used in more and more products all the time. In the past, all you had to worry about was sugar-free gum. But these days xylitol can be found even in some brands of peanut butter, medications, including some brands of fish oil and other products you're not likely to think of. Here you can find a list of products containing xylitol.

Xylitol can cause liver failure and bleeding disorders too.


For a dog, xylitol is extremely toxic, and its ingestion is an emergency.

The first sign is usually vomiting, following by hypoglycemia as soon as within 30 minutes. A dog poisoned by xylitol often deteriorates quickly, developing lethargy, unsteadiness, seizures, and collapse. Aggressive supportive care needs to be given as soon as possible.

Xylitol ingestion is an emergency, folks.


If your dog ingests xylitol, run, don't walk, to a veterinarian.

This is one of the things where an ounce of prevention is worth a megaton of cure. Educate yourself about what products might be hiding this poison and keep them away from your dog.


Further reading:
What Happens in the Dog's Body with Xylitol Poisoning
Xylitol Intoxication in Dogs – A Not-So-Sweet Problem
Keep Chewing Gum Away from Your Dog!
Xylitol and the Basset Hound
What is Xylitol Poisoning in Dogs? Ask Boomer.
Can Peanut Butter Kill Your Dog?
Xylitol, Where It Can Be Hiding

Related articles:
Dog Medical Emergencies Survey
Dog Medical Emergencies Survey Results
Is Unproductive Retching an Emergency?
Is Difficulty Breathing an Emergency?
Is Panting an Emergency?
Is Severe Pain an Emergency?
Is Limping an Emergency?
Is Vomiting Bile in the Morning an Emergency?
Is Profuse Vomiting an Emergency?
Are Convulsions or Seizures an Emergency?
Is Loss of Appetite an Emergency?
Is Reduced Activity an Emergency?
Is Severe Lethargy an Emergency?
Is Inability to Stand an Emergency?
Is Inability to Urinate an Emergency?
Are Cuts and Abrasions an Emergency?
Is Bleeding an Emergency?
Is Blood in Vomit an Emergency?
Is Fresh Blood in Stool an Emergency?
Is Black, Tarry Stool an Emergency?
Are Pale Gums an Emergency?
Is an Unresponsive Dog an Emergency?
Is Coughing an Emergency?
Is Choking an Emergency?
Is Head Pressing and Emergency?
Are Bug Stings an Emergency?
Are Spider or Snake Bites an Emergency?
Are Animal Bites an Emergency?
Is Ingestion of Poison an Emergency?



Symptoms to Watch for in Your Dog now available in paperback and Kindle. Each chapter includes notes on when it is an emergency.
MINIMAL BLOGGER TEMPLATES BY pipdig