Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Do Dogs Get Hemorrhoids? Pray for Stormy

Stormy is a friendly, happy Collie mix who lives with my friend in the old country.

He is 18 years old, and with the exception of an old spinal injury that would give him a hard time now and then when he overdid things, he is still plenty eager to chase bitches. In my old country, dogs rarely get fixed, and a smell of a doggy girl in heat can get his attention in spite of his gray hairs. Actually, being blonde, he doesn't have that many of those.

Dog Conditions - Do Dogs Get Hemorrhoids? Pray for Stormy

A few weeks ago, he started having some bleeds from his rectum. 


During the first vet visit, my friend was told Stormy was suffering from hemorrhoids and came back with an ointment to put on that. A bump that would support that theory was sometimes apparent.

When my friend told me about what's going on with Stormy, I thought it was strange that I haven't yet heard of dog hemorrhoids.

Do dogs get hemorrhoids?


As I usually do, I went to look it up. The first reputable article I could find states the following:

"Fortunately for dogs, they don’t get hemorrhoids because the anatomy of their gastrointestinal system is different than humans. For one, they walk around on four feet, and we walk around on two. Our lower GI system runs more vertical, predisposing us to problems with hemorrhoids, but dogs’ lower GI system runs horizontally, putting less pressure on the blood vessels in the rectum and anus." ~Dr. Wooten, DVM/petMD

So how is it then? Can dogs get hemorrhoids or not and is that what Stormy has?

Some other articles cite that dog can indeed get hemorrhoids though it is quite rare. However, I have never heard of a dog having one, including a dog health group I run and those I follow.

There are things which are more likely such as anal gland problems, a prolapsed rectum, and anal tumors. I was not comfortable with the hemorrhoid diagnosis and found some articles in my native language for my friend to study.

I didn't think it was anal gland abscess; those are quite easy to diagnose. So would be a prolapsed rectum.

I was glad when my friend got a second opinion.


I was not glad, though, when I found out what the proper diagnosis was--an anal tumor.

The thing didn't seem to have been around for very long and until it started bleeding it didn't seem to had been causing much trouble either.

Surgery could prolong Stormy's life but removal isn't curable, involves removal of the tumor as well as affected lymph nodes, and radiation would likely be needed. Putting the little guy through all that at his age doesn't seem to make a whole lot of sense, and my friend doesn't have the money to do all that anyway. In over half of animals diagnosed with anal gland tumors, the cancer is likely metastasized to nearby lymph nodes at the time of diagnosis.

The general outlook isn't the greatest, and the vet deemed it untreatable.

I recommended my friend try turmeric, as she might as well. There are some other holistic therapy options, but those are not available there.

Not a whole lot left for my friend to do other than pray, which she is doing and I'd like my readers to join in prayer with her.

Not much take-home points here other than the advice not to assume your dog has hemorrhoids when you encounter such symptoms.

Let's, please, pray for Stormy.


Further reading:
Can Dogs Get Hemorrhoids?
Signs of Anal Gland Cancer to Be Aware of in Your Pet



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20 comments

  1. Interesting on the conflicting info about dog hemorrhoids. But good that it is rare if it can in fact happen. Sending good thoughts to your friend and Stormy!

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    1. Well, the anatomy IS different. And I have never heard of a dog having hemorrhoids ... too bad, though, it would have been a much better thing to deal with.

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  2. Oh so sorry to hear about Stormy's troubles. :( I never heard of hemorrhoids in dogs either. My cat suffered from an anal gland issue in the past and it was fixed with surgery. I hope that tumeric works to shrink the tumor. Sending prayers for Stormy. Has Stormy's guardian tried a holistic vet for alternative options?

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    1. Yes, anal gland issues are fairly common. Thank you for the prayers. We're talking about my old country; not many options there.

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  3. Oh, what terribly sad news 'bout Stormy. Peep #1 and I will keep him in our thoughts. Pray that he is comfortable and happy and able to live each day to its fullest. PURRS

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    1. Thank you so much; prayers can bring on healing.

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  4. Poor Stormy! I am glad your friend was able to get a second opinion but so sorry to hear the tumor isn't treatable. I will definitely keep Stormy in my thoughts and hope the turmeric helps.

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    1. Thank you; yes, glad she got a second opinion but the diagnosis sucks.

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  5. I am so very sorry for your friend and for Stormy!! How terribly sad and I am sure painful.
    My Nub kitty had one of those anal gland issues which went unnoticed until it burst.
    I am a very good pet parent but it was not noticeable visually! It must have grown under the skin and I never did feel or notice a lump.
    One day it just burst.
    I felt so bad for my Nub as I have no idea how much pain he was in but it seems to have happened quickly and he is perfectly fine now. The vet said there are no long term issues with anal glands that get clogged the way Nub's did.

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    1. So far it doesn't seem to be causing Stormy any visible amount of pain; just bothers him when it bleeds.

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  6. I have to say I've never even thought about whether or not dogs can get hemorrhoids! When I was first reading your post I thought "lucky dogs" about them not being able to get them, although by the time I got to the end I was thinking that for Stormy a hemorrhoid diagnosis would have been better than a tumor. I'm not the praying type but I'm sending Stormy well wishes!

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    1. I know, it was the first time ever I heard anything like that. But a hemorrhoid would have been a much better thing to have than what Stormy's got.

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  7. I'm so sorry to read this! Sending lots of good thoughts and prayers for Stormy!

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  8. oh no. That's just so very sad. Nothing replaces going to the vet and knowing for sure. We had an anal gland "burst" and that was already horrible ... this ... this breaks my heart.

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    1. Burst anal sack abscess is definitely quite horrible and painful. This doesn't seem to be overly painful, at least not yet. So there is that.

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  9. Stormy's owner may want to look into the Dog Cancer Survival Guide. There are many holistic treatments, even supplements and changes in dog food that may help, or at least make him more comfortable.

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    1. Great plan but she doesn't speak any English. I did give her some options to try.

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  10. I'm sorry that Stormy's condition is not curable. Sending good thoughts for Stormy and all the people that care about him!

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    1. Well, anything is curable by God; so we're praying.

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