Saturday, January 3, 2015

10 Most Sought Out Dawg Business Topics in 2014

I couldn't say I'm surprised by which posts made it to the top of the list. The trend confirms my direction for the upcoming year.


1. Symptoms to Watch for in Your Dog: Excessive Drinking (Polydipsia)

There are a number of reasons why a dog can start drinking more than usually and it is so important to pay attention to this symptom. I get a lot of questions about this. If your dog starts drinking more than normally, do take it seriously.

2. Symptoms to Watch for in Your Dog: Excessive Panting

Dogs can pant for totally normal reasons, such as excitement, exercise, to cool themselves down. But excessive panting can be a sign of heatstroke, fever, pain, hormonal imbalances or respiratory or cardiovascular disorders.

3. Symptoms to Watch for in Your Dog: Excessive Drooling

Dogs drool. some breeds more than others. Some dogs just walk around with shoe laces hanging from their mouths all the time, decorating their surrounding in Pollock style every time they shake. Reading what is a symptom of a problem and what is not is about noticing what has changed. I'd be equally concerned if my dog who never drools suddenly started as I would be if my dog who always drools suddenly stopped.

Here are links to the full, still expanding series on dog symptoms (all of the articles checked by a vet):

Veterinarians Answer: 10 Main Symptoms To Watch For In Your Dog 
Symptoms: Recognition, Acknowledgement And Denial 
When Is It An Emergency? 
Symptoms To Watch For In Your Dog: Excessive Panting
Symptoms To Watch For In Your Dog: Excessive Drinking
Symptoms To Watch For In Your Dog: Bad Odor 
Symptoms to Watch For In Your Dog: Excessive Drooling  
What Can Your Dog's Gums And Tongue Tell You? 
Symptoms To Watch For In Your Dog: Coughing 
Symptoms To Watch For In Your Dog: Excessive Head Shaking  
Symptoms To Watch For In Your Dog: What Is That Limp? 
Symptoms To Watch For In Your Dog: Nose Bleeds (Epistaxis)
Symptoms To Watch For In Your Dog: Unexplained Weight Loss
Symptoms To Watch For In Your Dog: Loss Of Appetite  
Symptoms To Watch For In Your Dog: Lethargy 
Symptoms To Watch For In Your Dog: Fever (Pyrexia) 
Don't Panic, Don't Panic: Know What Your Job Is  
Whats In The Urine? (Part I: What You Can Notice On Your Own)
What's In The Urine? (Part II: Urinalysis)
A Tale of Many Tails—and What Came Out From Underneath Stories from My Diary-rrhea (part I)
Acute Small Intestinal Diarrhea
Acute Large Intestinal Diarrhea (Acute Colitis)
Chronic Large Intestinal Diarrhea
Chronic Small Intestinal Diarrhea

4. Collie Nose: Discoid Lupus Erythematosus (DLE) In Dogs

This topic doesn't seem to have very good representation out there. For that reason I asked my friend, Dr. Daniel Beatty to contribute with an article on alternative treatments of the condition. It's a great article and if your dog does have this problem, do check it out.

5. Medical Jargon Explained: Hypo- versus Hyperadrenocorticism 

Little mini series explaining some of the medical terminology; perhaps I should do a few more of those.


6. Whats In The Urine? (Part I: What You Can Notice On Your Own) 

This one is really part of the symptoms series, though titled differently. It highlights what your dog's urine can tell you about their health. It is important to understand what you're seeing. Part II goes into details about urinalysis.

7. Surviving The Post-Op: After Your Dog's ACL Surgery

This article is a summary of what we learned by going through a knee surgery twice. I think it's a useful info for anybody who's going through this for the first time. It was a scary experience at first.

8. Medical Jargon Explained: Hypo- versus Hyperglycemia 

An article explaining what these words means, what is blood sugar, how it gets to be too low or too high and what does that mean for the dog's body.

9. Cruciate Ligament (ACL/CCL) Surgery Post-Op Care: Example Plan 

It is alarming how many surgeons send the dog home without any instructions on post-op care to speak of. What happens after the surgery is just as important that what happens during the surgery. If your vet does not give you a detailed post-op plan, demand one.


10. Spider Bites Dog

An account of real-life experience with a spider bite. Since this can happen to anybody, I highly recommend everybody reads this.

There are couple articles on my blog on creepy crawlies, written by Dr. Jennifer Coates. I recommend you read them too.
Protect Your Dog From Snake Bites 
More Creepy Crawlies 

Which was your favorite or most helpful article?

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